DC Attorney General Investigates White Cop who Niggerized & Handcuffed 9-year-old Black Child for Leaning Against a Car & Talking Back to a Public Ruler

IMAGES BLURRED TO PROTECT SYSTEM OF RACISM & GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY. From {HERE] A white DC Police officer is under investigation after he was seen on video handcuffing a 9-year-old boy just two days ago. Now, the District's attorney general is weighing in.

D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine will soon propose recommendations about how the Metropolitan Police Department should interact with children. Sources tell FOX 5 Mayor Muriel Bowser and Police Chief Peter Newsham are in agreement with the proposal.

The office of the attorney general will survey the practices of police and relevant law enforcement authorities across the country in order to highlight what the best practices are regarding police interactions with children.

Then, the attorney general will review the best practices against the current MPD orders and policies and provide recommendations for improvement.

Finally, the attorney general will recommend what changes, if any, should be made about training police officers regarding the proper way to interact with children. [MORE]

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The NACDL’s Compelled Decryption Primer: If a Phone is Locked or Encrypted Can Cops Compel You to Unlock or Decrypt it?

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From [NACDL] The Supreme Court recognized in Riley v. California that cell phones are unlike other types of physical objects. 134 S.Ct. 2473 (2014). Instead, the Court held, they are minicomputers that contain the most intimate details of life. Due to their immense storage capacity, combined with the many distinct types of private data they contain, the Court held that the Fourth Amendment requires law enforcement to get a warrant to search a cell phone, even incident to arrest.

But if a device is locked or encrypted, can law enforcement compel a suspect to unlock or decrypt it? This primer outlines the state of the law on compelled decryption and offers a guide for defense lawyers on this important emerging issue.

The majority of Americans now own several devices that are encrypted until unlocked by a passcode or biometric mechanism. A passcode can be a secret number, pattern, or alphanumeric password. Biometric locks may use a fingerprint or face scan. These locks serve to make their contents inaccessible and unreadable until unlocked and decrypted by an authorized user.

While the lawfulness of a device search is a Fourth Amendment issue, the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination is the central safeguard against compelled decryption. To successfully assert this right, the act of decryption must be compelled, incriminating, and “testimonial.” While the first two requirements are often easily met, the key question is whether decryption is testimonial.

Is Compelling Decryption “Testimonial”?

The majority of Americans now own several devices that are encrypted until unlocked by a passcode or biometric mechanism. A passcode can be a secret number, pattern, or alphanumeric password. Biometric locks may use a fingerprint or face scan. These locks serve to make their contents inaccessible and unreadable until unlocked and decrypted by an authorized user.

While the lawfulness of a device search is a Fourth Amendment issue, the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination is the central safeguard against compelled decryption. To successfully assert this right, the act of decryption must be compelled, incriminating, and “testimonial.” While the first two requirements are often easily met, the key question is whether decryption is testimonial.

The act of decrypting a device may be “testimonial” under the Fifth Amendment if it explicitly or implicitly conveys the fact that certain data exists or is in the possession, custody, or control of an individual. See In Re Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum, 670 F.3d 1335 (11th Cir. 2012). Such an “act of production” may itself be incriminating or effectively concede the “existence, possession and control, and authenticity” of potentially incriminating evidence on a device. Id. at 1343. This analysis often hinges on the type of lock employed.

Numeric or Alphanumeric Locks: Courts have generally found that compelling individuals to provide their numeric or alphanumeric passcode is potentially testimonial under the Fifth Amendment, as it forces the defendant to reveal “the contents of his own mind.” In Re Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum 670 F.3d at 1345; see also U.S. v. Apple MacPro Computer, 851 F.3d 238 (3d Cir. 2017). It is analogous to compelling production of the combination to a wall safe, which is testimonial, as opposed to surrendering the key to a strongbox, which is not. See Doe v. U.S., 487 U.S. 201, 220 (1988). However,evenifacourt ndsthatprovidingthepasscodeis“testimonial,” itmaystillfallunderthe“foregoneconclusion” exception, which is addressed on the next page.

Biometric Locks: Some courts have found nothing testimonial under the Fifth Amendment about compelling the production of biometric keys, such as a fingerprint, similar to tests that gather physical evidence. See, e.g., State v. Diamond, 905 N.W.2d 870 (Minn. 2018); Matter of Search of [Redacted] Washington, D.C., 317 F. Supp. 3d 523 (D.D.C. 2018); Commonwealth v. Baust, 89 Va. Cir. 267 (Va. Cir. Ct. 2014). Recently, however, others have begun to hold that compelling the production of a biometric key is just as testimonial as a numeric one. See Matter of Residence in Oakland, California, 354 F. Supp. 3d 1010, 1016 (N.D. Cal. 2019); In Re Application for a Search Warrant, 236 F. Supp. 3d 1066 (N.D. Ill. 2017). From this perspective, “biometric features serve the same purpose of a passcode, which is to secure the owner's content, pragmatically rendering them functionally equivalent.” 354 F. Supp. 3d at 1015.

Is it a “Foregone Conclusion”?

Even if the act of decryption is potentially testimonial, it may not violate the Fifth Amendment if the implicit facts conveyed by doing so would be a “foregone conclusion” that “adds little or nothing to the sum total of the government's information.” U.S. v. Hubbell, 530 U.S. 27, 45 (2000). As a general rule, the “foregone conclusion” exception applies if the government can show it knows the location, existence, and authenticity of the purported evidence with reasonable particularity. Id. at 27. But the Supreme Court has never applied the exception beyond business documents, indicating an unwillingness to do so where more private and personal documents, like a diary, are at issue. Fisher v. U.S., 425 U.S. 391, 401 & n.7 (1976) (citing U.S. v. Bennet, 409 F.2d 888, 897 (2d Cir. 1969)). It is therefore essential to challenge whether the doctrine applies at all in the digital context. The Court has repeatedly emphasized that cell phones are not like ordinary closed containers or physical objects. See Riley, 134 S. Ct. at 2491 (“[A] cell phone search would typically expose to the government far more than the most exhaustive search of a house”); Carpenter v. U.S., 138 S.Ct. 2206, 2220 (2018) (requiring a warrant for historical cell phone location information). Indeed, the breadth and depth of private information contained in modern electronic devices simply did not exist when the Court established the foregone conclusion rule. Defense counsel should argue that it does not apply in the context of digital devices, just as the Court declined to apply the search-incident-to- arrest rule in Riley and the longstanding "third-party doctrine" in Carpenter.

In the alternative, the critical question is whether the government already knows of the existence and location of relevant files and can show that the client can access them. In Re Grand Jury Subpoena Duces Tecum, 670 F.3d at 1346. Lower courts are currently split on the test for deciding this question in the context of digital devices. Each of the tests is addressed below: [MORE]

Videos Capture White Rio Vista Cop Slapping a Cellphone Out of a Black Woman’s Hand & then Slamming Her Head Against the Ground to Make False Arrest

From [HERE] Newly released police body cam videos and cellphone footage reveal a Rio Vista Police Department officer slamming an unarmed woman to the ground in an apparent act of excessive force. After the officer slapped the cellphone out of the woman’s hand, her mother attempted to record the rest of the incident on her cellphone as another officer detained her.

On Sunday, Mea Thomas, Monaisha Thomas, brother-in-law Tyrone Clayton Jr., and a fourth passenger were reportedly pulled over by California police officers for suspended vehicle registration. Clayton called his stepsister, Cherish Thomas, and his stepmother, Deshaunna Payne, to ask them to record the incident with the Rio Vista police officers for transparency.

According to Rio Vista Police Chief Dan Dailey, Thomas and Payne obstructed the investigation by resisting orders and physically attacking the officers. But according to the videos, Thomas exited the passenger side while recording the officers on her cellphone. As Thomas approached one of the officers, he slapped the cellphone out of her hand before slamming her against the ground with more force than necessary.

With the officer rubbing Thomas’ face into the dirt, Payne attempted to save her as another officer prevented her from interfering.

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“I wasn’t trying to attack them. He slammed my baby,” Payne told KCRA. “I went in mother mode to protect my child.”

“That is a very small snippet of video that does not accurately portray the totality of the circumstances,” Rio Vista Police Chief Dailey stated.

On Monday, Thomas reportedly returned home from the hospital after receiving treatment for the officer slamming her head against ground.

“I was scared,” Thomas recalled. “I’m not going to lie. Because at the end of the day, that’s a police officer, and they can do what they want to do.”

According to the Rio Vista Police Department, the department is currently conducting an internal investigation into the alleged use of excessive force.

In the Presence of Color White NJ Cop Gets Angry: After He Snatched a Phone from a Black Man During Traffic Stop & Threatened to Beat Another for Recording, He Lied & Said his Bodycam was On

From [HERE] White Atlantic City police officer Andrew Jaques was fired in 2006 for his aggression but was reinstated and has not changed.

After snatching a phone from a Black man during a traffic stop and threatening to beat another Black man in the car for recording, Atlantic City police officer Andrew Jaques tried to ressaure the men that they had nothing to worry about because he was recording everything on his body cam.

But when the media requested to see that video, they were told it did not exist.

What does exist, however, is the 1:17 minute video recorded by 22-year-old Antoine Jones who remained passive and respectful while Jaques barked orders and threats in that roid rage resonance so common in cops.

That video, released this week, is the key piece of evidence in a pending lawsuit against Jaques, who has a long history of losing his temper in traffic stops as well as beating and choking citizens, including his girlfriend.

"You frog the fuck up, I guarantee you that 90-pound dog is going to come out and rip the fuck out of you," he yelled at the two men who were sitting quietly not even sure why they had been pulled over.

They're still not sure why they were pulled over on February 14, 2017 and threatened and searched before being released with no citation and no explanation so we can assume they were pulled over for driving while black.

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According to NJ.com:

Officer Glenn Anthony Abrams Jr. pulled over 22-year-old Antoine Jones and his passenger, 21-year-old Brian Wilson, at Mediterranean and Pennsylvania avenues on the evening of Feb. 14, 2017. According to the lawsuit, veteran officer Andrew Jaques then allegedly “pulled up to the scene like a lunatic.”

It’s unclear why Jones and Wilson were pulled over, but the officers did not charge them with any traffic violations or criminal offenses after the stop and search of their vehicle.

Jaques and Abrams approached the passenger-side window of the 2001 Saturn, and when Wilson began videotaping the encounter, Jaques allegedly stuck his hand through the open window and “violently” grabbed Wilson’s phone.

However, Jones continued to videotape the incident, in which the two men in the car asked the officers why they were being pulled over and whether Wilson could have his phone back.

“I’m gonna explain this one time and one time only,” Jaques says in the video that is over one minute long. “This is gonna go two ways. You are gonna act like a gentleman and I’m gonna treat you like a gentleman. You frog the f--- up, I guarantee you that 90-pound dog is gonna come out and rip the f--- out of you."

In a normal world, we would be shocked at how Jaques has been able to maintain his job for so long but we have long learned that cops like him are the most protected by the Blue Mafia.

A federal judge once described him as being "volatile" and having a "short fuse," according to a journalistic investigation by the Asbury Park Press last year that revealed his troubled past.

Jaques, 39, was the subject of at least five internal affairs investigations in an eight-month period in 2001 and 2002, according to federal civil court records. He was fired in 2006, but later reinstated by the Civil Service Commission, records show.

At least one of the internal affairs investigations was handled by his uncle, a sergeant in the department's internal affairs unit, court documents revealed.

Internal affairs complaints accused Jaques of losing his temper in traffic stops and allegedly abusing his girlfriend, bludgeoning a bicyclist and choking a restrained man unconscious in the 2001 and 2002 period.

He also had a pending disciplinary charge for which he received a 30-day "punishment of record" before officially leaving the department. The pending charge was not released by the city. Jaques had been on medical leave since May 2017.

One excessive force lawsuit against Jaques and the Atlantic City Police Department filed in 2016 is pending. The city refused to release the terms of the settlement from a second suit.

According to New Jersey law, citizens have the right to record traffic stops as long as they are not interfering. [MORE]

Provocative, Sarcastic White Female Cop Calls Black Men NGHRS During an Unlawful Stop for Trespass & Unlawful Frisk & Search for Weapons Outside of McDonald's in Mo County

NOT FREE TO LEAVE IN A FREE-RANGE PRISON. The WashPost reports; David Lemon-Gray and three friends had just gotten breakfast at a McDonald’s in White Oak on Thursday and walked outside, he said, to take up their daily spot waiting for the landscaping company truck that would take them to their job.

“We weren’t bothering anybody,” Lemon-Gray, 25, said Friday as he described events preceding an encounter with police, captured on video, that continued to reverberate in Montgomery County.

Lemon-Gray said the exchange with police began when a sergeant approached the four African American men and questioned them about loitering. The sergeant was joined in a short time by at least six more officers. One, a white female, used the n-word about 12 minutes after she arrived — which one of Lemon-Gray’s friends captured in part on video and shared to social media Thursday afternoon. The county police department launched an investigation and by Thursday night released the female officer’s body-worn camera footage.

A county police spokesman, Capt. Tom Jordan, said the police response was initiated by an officer who “observed the subjects loitering in an area that McDonald’s had identified as being problematic.”

The union that represents county officers, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 35, defended the officer in a statement Friday that said the video showed she did not have ill intent.

The body-camera recording shows one of the men was the first to use the n-word, which was then used later by the officer as an exchange continued.

“A review of the body worn camera footage shows a retort, made without any discriminatory intent, repeating the comment made by a male subject being detained,” the union statement read. The union “and the officer involved do not condone discriminatory language nor do they believe there should be any discriminatory practices in policing.” [MORE]

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Words can have any meaning the speakers intend for them to have. Here, we will never know the white cop’s intent. However, we do know that most white people hate Black people. Neely Fuller explains “the reason that most white people hate Black people is because whites are not Black people. If you know this about white people, you need know little else. If you do not know this about white people, virtually all else that you know about them will only confuse you."  We also know that most white people participate in the system of racism/white supremacy. So, if you hear a white person say the word nigger then you are probably listening to a racist who intended to use the word as a derogatory term.  

Nigger means "a non-white person who is subject to the system of White Supremacy." [MORE] In the absence of racism/white supremacy niggers would not exist . Nigger is what is being done to us. [MORE]

Here, the cops have stopped the Black men for trespass, a criminal misdemeanor in MD. To establish said offense the Government must prove that the Black men remained on the private property after having been notified by the owner not to do so. Based on the info provided by the cops to the WashPost it appears that no one at the McDonald’s told the Black men to leave or called the cops for their assistance. As such, there could be no probable cause or reasonable suspicion to detain them.

The subsequent search and frisk for weapons during the trespass stop was also illegal, - if you are believer in so-called 4th Amendment “rights.” In a consensus reality (in which cops also share your belief in the “right to be free from seizures and searches” guaranteed by the Government) in order for the police to stop you the Supreme Court has ruled that police must have reasonable articulable suspicion that there is criminal activity afoot and that you are involved in the activity. Police may not act on on the basis of an unclear and unparticularized suspicion or a hunch - there must be some specific articulable facts along with reasonable inferences from those facts to justify the intrusion.  In order to frisk you the Supreme Court has ruled that the police must have independent reasonable articulable suspicion that the person is armed and dangerous before they may touch you or put their hands on you (a cursory patdown for weapons). Police may not act on on the basis of an unclear and unparticularized suspicion or a hunch - there must be some specific, actual & articulable facts along with reasonable inferences from those facts to justify the intrusion. No such basis existed here at the McDonald’s for cops to search and frisk the young men for weapons during the trespass stop.

In actual reality race soldiers so frequently abuse their power that no Black motorist, juvenile, adult or professional of any kind—could make a compelling argument that constitutional rights afford Black people any real protection from Government authority and its orderlies. In the context of White American domination there is no innocent Black male, just Black male criminals who have not yet been detected, apprehended or convicted. [MORE]

Student's Artwork of a Pig Dressed as a Police Officer Rattles White Authorities at Madeira Municipal Bdlg, Thin-Skinned Cops Force its Removal, Citing Government's Right to Control Thought

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From [HERE] As defenders of free expression and artistic freedom, the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) condemns the removal of a student artwork from an exhibition in Madeira, Ohio. The removal of the work shows a deep disregard for the young artist’s constitutional right to free expression, and is a flagrant violation of free speech principles. It is a sad day when the message school administrators choose to send to students is to refrain from expressing their opinions about contemporary social issues lest they offend someone.

In response to complaints, the work was removed from an annual exhibition of art made by Madeira students of different ages. It fulfilled a class assignment where students chose topics from news articles and recreated them as visual art. The controversial work combined newspaper clippings of recent articles about police brutality with a police officer depicted as a pig in uniform.

The exhibition is on view at the Madeira Municipal Building, which also houses the Madeira Police Department headquarters. [MORE]

Study Reveals the 'War On Cops' is Pure Bullshit: Data Demonstrates it's Safer than Ever to be a Cop, On-Duty Deaths in Decline the Past 5 Decades

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“Naked Lies Offered as Reality.” From [TechDirt] The "War on Cops" is a belief system that's currently being preached to the converted. Evidence abounds that it's safer to be a cop now than it's ever been, and yet, officers still claim they're being targeted and use these unfounded fears to obtain military equipment and qualified immunity rulings.

We've covered how safe police work is here before. But the narrative coming from the law enforcement community refuses to change, despite evidence to the contrary. Research is piling up, exposing law enforcement agencies' claims of cops being targeted by a vengeful populace as a self-serving lie. At best, these claims are merely wrong. But given the easy access to law enforcement officer death data, a refusal to see the stats for what they are is incredibly disingenuous at best.

Adding yet more documentation to the pile is a study released by researchers from three American universities. The study [PDF] shows policing just keeps getting safer.

The number of line-of-duty deaths has declined dramatically over the last five decades. Policing is a much safer profession now than it was 50 years ago. Despite a 75% drop in deaths, however, there has been remarkable stability in geographic-, temporal-, and incident-level characteristics. Also, several notable changes over time reflect favorably on improved safety in policing, such as declines in deaths resulting from aircraft crashes and accidental gunfire. Other trends are troubling, though, such as the stability in deaths during auto pursuits and a two-fold increase in deaths from vehicular assaults. Currently, the “war on cops” thesis is not supported by any evidence, and we apply the 50-year lens in this study to provide important context for understanding recent trends in officer deaths.

The number of deaths continues to drop despite a few high-profile incidents in which cops were targeted and killed. What's interesting is officers' lack of concern for their own safety, as is evidenced by the numbers of deaths related to vehicle pursuits.

Interestingly, deaths occurring during automobile pursuits remained stable over time (5% to 6%) despite policy changes adopted by departments to restrict and control pursuits (Alpert, 1997).

In addition, significant shifts in cause of death occurred among nonfelonious cases. The most common cause was automobile/motorcycle accidents, and the proportion increased significantly over time from 37.9% in 1970–1979 to 52.0% in 2000–2016.

There's nothing "interesting" about this. Departments have regularly enacted policies meant to curb the use of high-speed pursuits to capture criminal suspects. Just as regularly, officers have ignored these policies. There is also an observed tendency for officers to drive aggressively when responding to calls, increasing the chance of accidents, injuries, and death.

Aggressive action by officers -- not just in terms of driving, but also in terms of interactions with the public -- appears to be greeted in kind.

Researchers have also documented an association between aggressive patrol style and greater rates of assault (Kaminski et al., 2003; Morrison & Meyer, 1974; Regens et al., 1974; but see Wilson & Zhao, 2008). Fridell et al. (2009: 550) concluded that “agencies that have a culture of aggressiveness will likely ‘produce,’ not just more force against subjects, but also violence against police.”

Escalation remains a problem. De-escalation could save lives, as could simply treating the suspects like human beings, rather than punching bags or bullet receptacles. Aggressive tactics are making cops less safe in an era of unprecedented officer safety.

Another unsurprising finding is that the so-called "Ferguson effect" is pure bullshit.

A handful of scholars has sought to test elements of a “Ferguson Effect” directly, particularly as it relates to crime rates and depolicing. In regard to allegations of a “war on cops,” Maguire and colleagues (2017) found no evidence that the events in Ferguson (and after) led to an increase in felonious killings of police officers. By focusing on a time period spanning January 2010 through March 2016 and by using an intervention of August 2014, they found that anti-police rhetoric was not associated with a rise in the number of police officers murdered across multiple interrupted time-series estimation techniques. The analyses and their findings were robust, indicating no evidence of either an abrupt or gradual increase in felonious homicides post–Ferguson.

How can law enforcement officials who still push this rhetoric explain their refusal to accept the facts? It's not as though researchers are juking a proprietary data set to come to these conclusions. The data set used in this case comes directly from law enforcement reporting, collected by a pro-law enforcement entity: the Officer Down Memorial Page, run by a nonprofit that says it's "dedicated to honoring America's fallen law enforcement heroes."

If anyone's still pushing a "War on Cops" narrative in the face of these facts, they've got something to sell. The public isn't buying it, but that hardly matters when there's a captive audience just dying to hear how unappreciated they are even as they march fearlessly into the face of certain death mild antagonism.

[“In the Ma’afa We Become the Host for the Yurugu Virus"] Black Judge says NoJail Time for Black Detroit Cop Guilty of Brutally Pummeling a Mentally Ill Black Woman at Hospital

From [HERE] A Black police officer convicted in the beating of a naked, unarmed and mentally ill Black woman at Detroit Receiving Hospital has avoided jail time.

A Detroit district court judge on Wednesday sentenced Dewayne Jones of the Detroit Police Department to 12 months' probation, ordering him to attend anger management classes and perform 15 days of community service.

A jury found the 47-year-old guilty in March of misdemeanor assault and battery. He could have served up to 93 days in jail under sentencing guidelines. 

The 29-year-old woman -- a patient said to be suffering from a "mental breakdown" in the emergency room -- was punched several times by the 18-year veteran of the DPD, while other officers were holding her. The beating was caught on cell phone video by a witness who sent it to the media, leading to Jones' suspension, an investigation, and eventually charges by the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office.

Witnesses testified that the woman spat at Jones, shouted profanities and bit an officer as she was being escorting to hospital's crisis unit for an evaluation. Jones' defense attorney Pamella Szydlak told the court that the woman was "vulgar, violent and aggressive," despite Jones' efforts to calm her.

While prosecutors argued that Jones' acted with excessive force, felony charges in the case were dismissed by Judge Cylenthia Miller who said the woman in this case "was completely out of control." But the misdemeanor charges remained.

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Like the Constitution says If You Spit at Cops They Can Try to Kill You. When applied to mere mortals in the criminal law, self-defense permits a person, who was not the aggressor to use reasonable force when he actually reasonable believes he faces imminent bodily harm. Reasonable force means no more force than is necessary to ward off the attack. The proportionality rule provides that a person is not justified in using force that is excessive in relation to the harm threatened. Such rules clearly have no applicability to cops who are super human representatives of authority acting above human morality. We are bound by the written law but authoritarians are bound by the law of the jungle. [MORE

After video of the incident went viral, Detroit Police Chief James Craig called it "troubling,"wondering why the officer chose to punch the woman rather than deploying his Taser. 

Jones was suspended from the DPD, but later reinstated at a lower rank.   

A 20-year veteran Detroit Police corporal was given probation Wednesday and ordered to attend anger management classes for punching a mentally unstable Black woman in a Detroit hospital last year.

Judge Kenneth King of 36th District Court said video footage of the incident "did not look good" but added that he has a "crystal clear" department record.

The judge said in the video, Jones looked "like a rogue officer gone wild" but added, "I don't think he's a rogue officer at all."

KIng gave Jones six months less probation than was recommended in a presentence report by the court's probation department.

"I'm not going to treat Corporal Jones any better or worse (than any other defendant)," the judge said, adding that Jones would have harmed the woman more if he had used a Taser.

FUNKTIONARY    STATES:    Ma'afa -  {Kiswahili) —word-concept that means the ''Great Suffering" of Afrikans at the hands of the Europeans (Caucasian consciousness, i.e., the White Presumacy of White Supremacy) in the Western hemisphere. 2) the great disconnection from the cultural womb of Mother Africa by her kidnapped and enslaved children into foreign lands. The Ma'afa (a uniquely Afrikan experience perpetrated against Afrikans) carries the Yurugu virus. The  process  of the Ma'afa is Europeans committing cultural genocide (i.e., the killing of the genes) against Afrikan people with the main objective of erasing our cultural memory, which by design, breaking down the cultural (immune system) of the Afrikan people. In the Ma'afa we become the host for the Yurugu virus. It infects us and affects our thinking, spirituality, behavior and approach to life—regardless of the physical proximity of the Caucasian or jurisdiction to his system of justice or commerce—to the point where we destroy ourselves.

FUNKTIONARY STATES:

Ma'afa - {Kiswahili)—word-concept that means the ''Great Suffering" of Afrikans at the hands of the Europeans (Caucasian consciousness, i.e., the White Presumacy of White Supremacy) in the Western hemisphere. 2) the great disconnection from the cultural womb of Mother Africa by her kidnapped and enslaved children into foreign lands. The Ma'afa (a uniquely Afrikan experience perpetrated against Afrikans) carries the Yurugu virus. The process of the Ma'afa is Europeans committing cultural genocide (i.e., the killing of the genes) against Afrikan people with the main objective of erasing our cultural memory, which by design, breaking down the cultural (immune system) of the Afrikan people. In the Ma'afa we become the host for the Yurugu virus. It infects us and affects our thinking, spirituality, behavior and approach to life—regardless of the physical proximity of the Caucasian or jurisdiction to his system of justice or commerce—to the point where we destroy ourselves.

Jones' defense attorney Pamella Szydlak said Wednesday that her client has been a "dedicated  honest, sincere and outstanding" police officer. 

"He has dedicated his entire adult life to criminal justice," she said in court  "Still, our position is that Corporal Jones acted (within the guidelines) of his training."

Assistant Wayne County Prosecutor Joshua Holman said his office was not asking for any jail time for the officer but Jones' actions "were wrong and criminal."

The sister of the woman Jones punched was visibly upset Wednesday over the sentencing. She said she was not happy with the punishment given to the corporal but declined to say more.

The victim did not attend the hearing. The sister said she is in a treatment facility and has been assigned a guardian to care for her.

Local activists say the sentence for Jones was too soft.

"Corporal Dewayne Jones should serve time for his violent crime," said Scotty Boman of Detroit Residents Advancing Civilian Oversight. "The man beat a woman and serves no time. ... This trivializes acts of violence against women to nothing worse than a nonviolent crime. This is a green light for officers who may be predisposed to use excessive force."

The Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality also criticized the sentence.

"Judge King's decision sends the message that mentally challenged women's rights are of no value, said group member Chris White. "The officer had the responsibility to show restraint in this matter and chose violence as a solution. This is a clear case of police brutality. The Board of Police Commissioners should direct the chief to remove Corporal Jones from the force."

Jones remains on "restrictive status" as an officer with Detroit police with a mandatory non-weapon condition, the department said Wednesday. An internal administrative investigation is continuing.

Judge Sanctions Decatur Memorial Hospital for Protecting a White Nurse at Jail who Refused to Give Black Man Insulin & Transport to Hospital, Causing His Death

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From [Herald Review] A federal judge on Wednesday imposed legal sanctions on Decatur Memorial Hospital for taking more than a year to hand over crucial information in a $50 million wrongful death lawsuit involving a Black man who died in the Macon County Jail.

Chicago-based attorney Rahsaan A. Gordon, who represents the estate of Michael A. Carter, said DMH did not provide the personnel file of licensed practical nurse Jo Bates during evidence-gathering portions of the case.

Carter died on July 18, 2015, just days after he was booked into the jail while he awaited federal court proceedings on drug and weapons charges. The lawsuit contends that Carter died because medical staff working at the jail refused to give him his prescription medicine for his diabetes. 

The file, released by DMH last month after a string of legal requests that Gordon said started in January 2018, revealed that Bates was fired for unsatisfactory performance. It also said jail staff were upset by derogatory comments made by Bates after Carter's death and didn’t want her to return to the jail.

Bates later denied making the statements when told about them by the hospital's human resources department, according to the personnel file. She did not appear at the hearing Wednesday, but her Peoria attorney, Peter Jennetten, declined to comment. 

The personnel document said unnamed Macon County correctional officers claimed Bates made several inappropriate comments in front of other staffers, such as “If you need anything, I’m going to the boat and will be drinking” and “This was God’s way of natural selection, weeding out the rif-raf” after Carter died. 

Bates was also criticized in the document by corrections officers who said that she told them Carter was faking his illness and was being uncooperative. The document said that officers claimed they approached the inmate as being combative and “used additional force” in dealing with him based on what Bates had told them.

Michael J. Kehart, lead attorney for DMH, told the judge that he had handed over the file information as soon as it was made known to him. But he also said he did not believe the information had to be turned over because it did not directly relate to the prisoner’s death.    U.S. Magistrate Judge Jonathan E. Hawley disagreed with Kehart, and said that his argument “verged on the frivolous.” As a result, he said he was taking the rare step of imposing sanctions on DMH for their failure to provide the personnel file when asked for documents in reference to the case.

Gordon argued during Wednesday’s hearing that DMH should be punished “for withholding” the information in Bates’ personnel file. “The only reason they would have for not turning it over is that they knew the information it contained was inflammatory and damaging to their case,” he said.

Gordon also said that he has obtained surveillance video of Macon County correctional officers manhandling Carter, picking him up by his neck and placing him in a wheelchair.

William Kurnik, a Rosemont attorney representing the sheriff’s office and its personnel listed as defendants in the case, declined to comment after the hearing.

Hawley ordered several key individuals to be deposed for a second time regarding the information contained in the personnel file, including Bates’ alleged statements and her eventual firing. They include Bates; Debbie Acciavatti, former director of DMH’s corporate health services; former Macon County Sheriff Thomas Schneider and former jail superintendent Lt. Bill Hotwick; John Ridley, DMH’s former executive vice president and chief operating officer; and Jennifer Allen of DMH’s human resources department, who wrote the narrative in Bates’ personnel file. 

The hospital was also ordered to pay all attorney’s fees, travel costs and other expenses in relation to the new depositions.

In a separate ruling, Hawley overruled objections from DMH’s legal team and ordered that CEO Tim Stone be deposed by Gordon. DMH argued that Stone shouldn’t testify because he didn’t have knowledge of day-to-day operations of the jail and its medical team, but Gordon said Stone had been involved in DMH bidding for the medical contract with the jail and was also involved in corporate discussions after Carter’s death.

“She asked the defendant Bates to immediately transfer him to a nearby hospital so he could receive adequate medical attention and an IV insulin drip. Defendant Bates refused, telling Mr. Carter’s mother that defendant Dr. Braco would check on him the following day. Defendant Bates further told Mr. Carter’s mother that he was simply having ‘anxiety about being incarcerated.’”

Gordon said Braco kept refusing to supply Carter with his medication or give him an insulin shot and, by July 18, the inmate was unable to stand on his own, not eating and disorientated.

Later in the day jail officers, alarmed at Carter’s condition, demanded Bates summon an ambulance, which Gordon said she refused to do. She eventually called Braco and told him Carter was in medical distress, but Braco refused his transfer to hospital.

“Only after pressure from the jail did defendants Dr. Braco and Bates finally relent and authorize Mr. Carter’s transfer to a hospital, but only by patrol car,” said Gordon, writing in the lawsuit. “... Although it was common knowledge that failure to treat diabetes could result in diabetic ketoacidosis and death, defendant Dr. Braco ordered that Mr. Carter could only be transferred to hospital using a regular patrol car, because he didn’t want to incur the $1,000 bill for an ambulance. Defendant Bates agreed.”

An ambulance did eventually rush Carter to Decatur Memorial Hospital but it was too late: Carter was pronounced dead at 12:35 p.m.

Lying, White Manatee Cop Fired but Not Charged for Violent Assault on Latino Man Held in Isolation for “Detox" for 2 Days After Misdemeanor Trespass Arrest

From [HERE] A Manatee County corrections deputy has been fired following an investigation into an excessive force incident

Sheriff Rick Wells identified the former deputy as 21-year-old Tyler LeMond. The investigation into LeMond began after deputies say he was caught on camera hitting inmate Jorge Ajanel with several knee strikes, a punch and a foot stomp.

"There is no place for this type of behavior in law enforcement," Sheriff Wells said in a statement. "It will not be tolerated at the Manatee County Sheriff's Office."

Sheriff Wells says the inmate did not file a complaint. But supervisors reviewed the video and launched an investigation about a week after it happened.

The incident happened on March 29 while the inmate was secured in a padded cell by himself.

According to the internal investigation report, Deputy LeMond was responding to a loud bang from the cell along with another deputy.

After ordering the inmate to get away from the door, video shows Deputy LeMond enter the cell and shove the inmate backward, causing him to fall onto his back. LeMond then tried to place the inmate in handcuffs while the other deputy tried to secure his legs.

"In the following 42 second struggle that ensued, Deputy LeMond struck [the inmate] with eight knee strikes, a closed fist punch and a foot stomp," the sheriff's office report states.

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The report states Ajanel was in the medical pod of the jail because he was detoxing. He was arrested on a misdemeanor trespassing charge. Other deputies say he was not disruptive that day.

During the investigation, LeMond told investigators when he entered the room, "Ajanel grabbed onto my arm and attempted to pull me towards him."

LeMond also added Ajanel was swinging his arms violently during the brawl. LeMon defended his actions saying, "From my point of view that was all necessary and justified."

Investigators disagreed. The report stated, "the preponderance of the evidence indicates Deputy LeMond's escalation of force was unwarranted and unreasonable."

The sheriff's office says it sent a capias request for battery to the State Attorney's Office in April. The State Attorney will now decide whether criminal charges will be filed against LeMond.

LeMond was fired on April 24. He joined the sheriff's office as a corrections deputy in March 2017.

Lawsuit says SRT Race Soldier Cops at Cuyahoga Jail Punched Black Man in the Face as He pulled His Pants Up, Pepper Sprayed His Mouth & Locked Him to a Restraint Chair in Isolation

From [HERE] A Black man sued Cuyahoga County, accusing two jail guards of using excessive force on him for no reason after he was booked in May 2018.

De’Von Bean, 30, said in a lawsuit that corrections officer Brandon Smith punched Bean and that officer Marvin Miller sprayed pepper spray into Miller’s mouth and face, even though Bean did nothing to provoke them.

The lawsuit also says medical staff did not properly treat Bean’s injuries for more than two days, even though he was in severe pain.

The lawsuit is the latest the county has faced in recent months, following the release of a U.S. Marshals Service report in November that detailed “inhumane” jail conditions. The report was written after seven inmates died over a period of several months, and an eighth inmate died in late December.

The marshals said the jail’s Special Response Team — nicknamed “The Men in Black” because of the paramilitary gear its members wear — threatened, harassed and intimidated inmates and used excessive force while forcing them out of their cells. Both Smith and Miller are members of the team.

Smith was disciplined earlier this year on accusations he shoved a different inmate and called him a “snitch.”

The report described team officers threatening and intimidating inmates as they escorted them to be interviewed by the marshals and said inmates were bullied in full view of marshals investigators. That behavior prompted the marshals to request that 10 inmates be released from jail “for fear of SRT members retaliation, and the legitimate fear of detainee/inmate safety,” the report states.

The suit also comes as criminal inquiries regarding the jail continue. Several guards have been indicted as a result of the probe.

Neither Smith nor Miller have been criminally charged in any case.

Bean’s lawsuit, filed in federal court in Cleveland by attorneys Sara Gedeon and David Malik, says he was assaulted at about 7 p.m. on May 6, 2018, the day he was arrested in Euclid on charges of improper handling of firearms in a motor vehicle, intoxicated disorderly conduct and playing loud music. He later pleaded guilty to an amended charge of persistent disorderly conduct.

While Bean was booked, Smith and Miller “aggressively approached” him and stared him down, the lawsuit states. Bean, who complied with all orders, expressed to concern to other jail staff that he felt Smith and Miller were going to do something to him, according to the suit.

The report described team officers threatening and intimidating inmates as they escorted them to be interviewed by the marshals and said inmates were bullied in full view of marshals investigators. That behavior prompted the marshals to request that 10 inmates be released from jail “for fear of SRT members retaliation, and the legitimate fear of detainee/inmate safety,” the report states.

The suit also comes as criminal inquiries regarding the jail continue. Several guards have been indicted as a result of the probe.

Neither Smith nor Miller have been criminally charged in any case.

Bean’s lawsuit, filed in federal court in Cleveland by attorneys Sara Gedeon and David Malik, says he was assaulted at about 7 p.m. on May 6, 2018, the day he was arrested in Euclid on charges of improper handling of firearms in a motor vehicle, intoxicated disorderly conduct and playing loud music. He later pleaded guilty to an amended charge of persistent disorderly conduct.

While Bean was booked, Smith and Miller “aggressively approached” him and stared him down, the lawsuit states. Bean, who complied with all orders, expressed to concern to other jail staff that he felt Smith and Miller were going to do something to him, according to the suit.

After booking, Smith and Miller escorted Bean to trade his street clothes to jail garb. He joked that both corrections officers took their jobs too seriously. He was not aggressive with either officer but while he pulled up his pants, “defendant Smith’s fist gratuitously came crashing into Plaintiff’s right jaw,” the suit states.

The punch knocked Bean out. When he woke up, he said “what the f--k?” and Miller then sprayed pepper spray into Bean’s mouth and face, according to the lawsuit.

The pair then put Bean, who had a broken jaw and bloody mouth, in a restraint chair and completed paperwork to have him put in disciplinary isolation, the lawsuit says.

“At all times herein, Defendants Smith and Miller … attacked and severely injured Mr. Bean simply because they became annoyed with him,” the lawsuit states, adding that the officers used excessive force as a punishment.

Smith, when filling out reports, did not accurately document the events involving Bean, the lawsuit says. Miller, meanwhile, didn’t write any report about the force, the suit states.

Both of their actions were against jail policy, yet there was no indication that either the county or then-jail director Ken Mills investigated the incident, according to the suit.

After being placed in the restraint chair, Bean was taken to the dispensary, the suit says. Nurse Catherine Clark ”completely disregarded” Bean’s injuries and wrote in her notes that there was “no bleeding, or break in skin, or other obvious injury noted,” according to the suit. Bean was sent back to his cell.

Even though his condition worsened, he was not prescribed Percocet until after a May 8 visit to MetroHealth confirmed Bean had a broken jaw, the suit states. He did not actually receive his medication until early May 9, according to the lawsuit.

Bean’s lawsuit includes claims for excessive force, civil rights violations, negligence and malpractice. It names the county, Smith, Miller, Mills, MetroHealth, Clark and Dr. Mary Hancock as defendants and also says county officials do not hold officers accountable for using excessive force.

He seeks an unnamed amount in damages.

Spokeswomen for the county and MetroHealth did not immediately respond to emails seeking comment.

Following the release of the marshals’ report, the county has released records on numerous corrections officers who have been accused of misconduct in recent years. Among them was Smith.

Smith admitted “some fault” in a Nov. 1, 2018, incident in which he was accused threatening a 29-year-old inmate and shoving him into a wall, according to records.

The encounter happened after Smith denied the inmate’s request to talk to his attorney because Smith was busy that day, records say. The inmate told Smith that he couldn’t deny him the conversation with his lawyer, to which Smith replied: “man shut up. You are a snitch anyway,” according to records.

Smith walked up to the inmate after that exchange, grabbed him, then shoved him into a glass wall. The officer tried to handcuff the inmate, but stopped and pushed him as other Special Response Team officers arrived to help, the records show.

Smith never reported shoving the inmate, but later admitted to it in an interview with investigators, county records say.

In a written statement, he said he didn’t believe he needed to report the push because he didn’t believe it rose to the level of a use-of-force that needed special documentation. The inmate was not hurt during the incident.

The incident happened on one of the three days the marshals were inside the jail to conduct its investigation. The inmate later told investigators that Smith repeatedly called him a snitch after he interviewed with “an outside agency that was here this week,” according to records.

Smith received a written warning for the incident.

Pursuant to the “Bucket Detail" Policy, Alabama Prison Authorities Shackle Prisoners to Buckets & Refuse to Remove Restraints Until They “shit 6 times in the Bucket"

From [Truthout] On March 25, 2019, Christopher Caldwell reportedly found himself nearly immobile, shackled to a bucket at Limestone Correctional Facility in Alabama. His pant legs were taped up, and his belly, feet and hands were shackled. Caldwell’s handcuffs were shackled to his belly, preventing him from moving his hands above his waist.

Caldwell had just been transferred to the prison from a relatively coveted work release center, and had already undergone extensive precautionary entrance procedures: several body cavity searches, metal detectors and drug dogs. But, per Capt. Patrick Robinson’s “bucket detail” policy — known colloquially as “shitting in a bucket” — Caldwell’s processing wasn’t complete. After guards placed him in a cell, shackled and taped him, he was told his restraints would not be removed until he “shat six times” in the bucket, according to an organizing group that platforms prisoners’ voices, Unheard Voices O.T.C.J. (Of The Concrete Jungle).

Caldwell was bound to the bucket in a cell without running water for five days. His pleas for help were either ignored by guards, or met with mace threats.

Another confined individual subjected to the “shitting in a bucket” practice, Daniel Bolden (AIS #254848), said that his memories of eating like a dog (due to constrained hands) are etched into his mind. Unable to shower, he was forced to lie near and in his own feces and urine.

The Normalization of Torture and Assault

A prisoner and organizer who goes by the pseudonym “Potential” hasn’t spent time at Limestone, but has spoken with others who have. He said they have told him that “Limestone is a different breed of prison — it has its own rules. No one wants to go there.”

Truthout spoke with Jane (name changed), a mother whose son is currently confined at Limestone. Jane wishes to remain anonymous, fearing retaliation against her son. Surveillance cameras aren’t common at Limestone, she told Truthout. Another prisoner tried to sexually assault her son, Jane said, but when he reported the incident, there was no evidence to support his complaint. And when a prisoner is placed in “lockup,” also known as administrative segregation, they are generally handled one on one, without oversight of other guards on duty, according to Potential.

Jane’s son hasn’t been subjected to bucket detail himself, but has described it to her. “Everyone knows it goes on here,” he said to her.

“Lockup is so crowded, that ADOC [Alabama Department of Corrections] started putting men in closets with the bucket for several days,” Jane explained.

These conversations follow a Department of Justice (DOJ) report released April 2, 2019, where the agency concluded that Alabama prisons, including Limestone, constitute “cruel and unusual punishment,” a violation of the Eighth Amendment. The report focused on the ways the ADOC fails to protect “prisoners from prisoner-on-prisoner violence and prisoner-on-prisoner sexual abuse.” The DOJ’s investigation into Alabama prison staffs’ use of excessive force and sexual abuse is an issue “pending with the court,” according to the report.

It is unclear whether the DOJ will release a report of this investigation. But preliminary conversations with those close to the Alabama prison system indicate a second report would probably not be any less damning than the first.

Jane said that she’s been extorted by lieutenants and guards (at a facility other than Limestone) for over $10,000. “Guards stabbed my son. Then I got a call from a Lieutenant who said things would get worse for him if I didn’t send money,” she said.

Another mother of a confined son at Limestone, who was also aware of bucket detail, told Truthout, “I actually had a female guard molest me on one of our visits. She literally put her hand inside of my underwear and touch [sic] my vagina.” The mother didn’t speak up out of fear of retaliation or a denial of her visitation. [MORE]

New Data Shows US Still Has Highest Incarceration Rate in the World - Locking Up Citizens at a rate 5 to 10 times higher than other industrialized countries

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From [EJI] New prison and jail population data released this week by the United States Department of Justice shows the United States still incarcerates its citizens at a rate 5 to 10 times higher than other industrialized countries. Some 2.27 million people were incarcerated in jails and prisons across the country in 2017 —a 500% increase over the last 40 years.

The Sentencing Project analyzed the data, which is current through the end of 2017. It shows that the prison population nationwide declined by 7.3 percent since its highest level in 2009, but the decrease is primarily attributable to reforms in six states that have reduced their prison populations by at least 30 percent in the past 20 years:  Alaska, Connecticut, California, New Jersey, New York, and Vermont.

The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that 1,489,363 people were incarcerated in state or federal prisons at year-end 2017. At the current rate of decline, it will take 75 years to cut the prison population by half, the Sentencing Project reports.

County and city jails held an additional 745,200 people at midyear 2017, about two-thirds of whom had not been convicted. In 2017, jails reported 10.6 million admissions.

The number of people in prison sentenced to life reached a record high of 206,000 people by year-end 2017. One of every seven people in prison is serving a life sentence. The Sentencing Project found that two-thirds of the people sentenced to life in prison are people of color.

Data analysis revealed another troubling trend: the rate of women's incarceration has been rising at a rate 50 percent higher than men's since the 1980s, and declines in the incarceration rate for women have been slower than for men. There are 111,000 women in prison in the United States.

The Richest Corporations Don't Pay Taxes - All are Owned & Run by Elite Neuropeans

Black rebel, Amos Wilson states:

If we were to add to the enormous entitlements the wealthiest classes receive from government (some of which were merely alluded to above) including inflated monies earned by the military-industrial complex and various types of government procurements, consulting services, and subsidies of all shapes, forms and fashions forged by these classes, it would be glaringly obvious that the elite classes are looting the nation's treasury, pillaging its resources, and "mugging" its working and poorer classes. And yet the paradox is that these poorer classes (including Black Americans) seem to approve of their exploitation by the reigning elite when judged by the fact of their repeated voting into office national, state and local regimes those who serve as the instruments for facilitating their wholesale robbery by the elite classes. More succinctly, the paradox is that Black America while complaining of oppression and exploitation by White America has not consolidated its own considerable resources and reorganized its community so as to revolutionize its power relation­ship with White America and end its subordination to that commu­nity. Even though the scope of this volume will not allow adequate answers, we must at least tentatively ask: By what means does the ruling White elite, and by extension the White race, maintain its political-economic dominance and power over America in general, and Black America in particular? This question suggests the counter question central to this book: By what means and methods of organization can Black America markedly attenuate or neutralize the power of White America — White domination — and its eco­nomic exploitation by this and other ethnic groups?

The White Elite Power Structure and the White American Nation-within-a-Nation

White political and economic domination of America is founded on the fact that Whites are an exclusive nation on American soil. They are organized as a state-within-a-state, having firmly established their own political system and central government, their own economic system, cultural and social institutions and hierarchical social class structure. Additionally, this nation of Whites maintains a standing military establishment of enormous war-making and defensive prowess, a preponderant national guard establishment and police force. Through these armed services it seeks to maintain both internal and external order in the interests of its national and international hegemony. The White nation-within-a-nation is practically always misidentified as synonymous with the United States as a whole by both its White and non-White "citizens" and by the peoples and governments of other nations. Even a cursory review of the history and current social dynamics of American race relations leads one very rapidly to the same conclusion as expressed by Andrew Hacker, a foremost scholar in the field.

America is inherently a "white" country: in character, in structure, in culture. Needless to say, black Americans create lives of their own. Yet, as a people, they face boundaries and constrictions set by the white majority. America's version of apartheid, while lacking overt legal sanction comes closest to the system even now being reformed in the land of its invention."

Hacker goes on to assert, "Rather than as a cauldron [melting pot], many commentators today prefer to see America as a mosaic or even a lumpy stew. At best, the pot still contains plenty of unmelted pieces." As a nation-within-a-nation, White America strictly and stringently controls entry and naturalization of outsiders within its bounds. This is especially the case in regard to Black Americans. Membership and naturalized citizenship within the White nation are carefully scrutinized, given long consideration (especially for non-Europeans) and is grudgingly and tentatively tendered. For Blacks, special laws, court rulings, judicial reviews, special commissions, periodic reviews and legislative abrogations of, or amendments to prior civil rights laws, affirmative action laws, rules arid regulations, customary racial discrimination and the like, all point to the fact that — despite the entry of some conspicuous Blacks who are given permits as "honorary Whites" — a would-be-nation of over 35 million Blacks are forbidden citizenship in the White nation; or even if granted tentative citizenship, Blacks assimilated into the White nation are always subject to identity checks, must be prepared to present their "passports", "pass books", certificates of authority and work permits on request in order to establish and prove their loyalty — and are subject to immediate revocation of citizenship and deportation without due process for minor infractions of social codes. Again, Hacker makes an astute observation in this regard:

the question is not "Who is white?" It might be more appropriate to ask "Who may be considered white?" ... In a sense, those who have already received the "white" designation can be seen as belonging to a club, from whose sanctum they ponder whether they want or need new members, as well as the proper pace of new admissions.

Hacker proceeds to say that White America as nation-within-a-nation, reserves the exclusive right to validate or invalidate as needs be the "whiteness" or "non-whiteness" of those seeking admission into its domains. While this nation may allow any number of ethnic or racial groups a valid claim to being "white," "African Americans were never given that indulgence. The reason is not that their coloration was too dark to allow for absorption into the "white" classification ... The point is that white America has always had the power to expand its domain. However, in the past and even now, it has shown a particular reluctance to absorb people of African descent." After noting that "a very considerable number of black Americans have achieved impressive careers, winning many of the rewards bestowed by white America," Hacker attests to the existence and exclusivity of the White nation when he argues that, "Still, there is no way that even the most talented of these men and women will be considered eligible for the honorific of 'white.' They are and will remain accom­plished blacks, regarded as role models for their race. But White Americans, who both grant and impose racial memberships, show little inclination toward giving full nationality to the descendants of African slaves." "[Emphasis added]

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Thus we see that the White American nation has effectively marginalized Black America and closed its borders to their absorption into its society and culture. Black representation and effective participation in its political affairs are minuscule and paternalisti-cally indulged. Black American ownership and control of its wealth-producing resources are small to the point of invisibility. Blacks are essentially excluded from full participation in its economic system. They are granted what is tantamount to a "work permit" or "working papers" in order to earn a living working at jobs reserved for outsiders and "resident aliens." The wonder is that the vast majority of Black Americans still consider themselves citizens of the same nation as Whites despite their placement on and containment in physical and psychological reservations and "native bantustans." [MORE]

The UN says: ‘Humans are Speeding Extinction at an Unprecedented Pace.’ Translation = There are Too Many Greedy Neuropeans Predominantly Occupied with the Destruction of the Universe = Yurugu]

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According to "FUNKTIONARY, THE KEY HOLDERS ENPSYCHLOPEDIA:" 

Weitko Disease - the caucasian’s patapathetic fascination with the exploitation and control of nature and exploitation and genocide of his fellow man. 

Yurugu - a mythological figure within the Dogon tribe (Africa) who is "the incomplete being" (fiend without a face) referring to Neuropeans (neurotic Europeans) within the European asili. 2) a regressive (degenerative) state of consciousness where the soul is cut off from itself. 3) the inability to recognize or abate unacknowledged destructive capabilities. Yurugu also expresses itself and manifests as the pathological condition that utterly fails to convince those in geographical proximity of its harmlessness, therefore has to kill them.   Yurugu is in a vicious spiral increasingly at odds with his own humanity—as fragmented, pathological, and distorted as it is.  (See: Asili, Caucasian, Racism White Supremacy, Elite, Western Civilization, Neuropean, WASP, Privilege, Oppression, Scarcity, Violence, Genocide, Manifest Density & Ma'afa)


WILL THE WHITE JESUS SAVE THEM? From [NYT] Humans are transforming Earth’s natural landscapes so dramatically that as many as one million plant and animal species are now at risk of extinction, posing a dire threat to ecosystems that people all over the world depend on for their survival, a sweeping new United Nations assessment has concluded.

The 1,500-page report, compiled by hundreds of international experts and based on thousands of scientific studies, is the most exhaustive look yet at the decline in biodiversity across the globe and the dangers that creates for human civilization. A summary of its findings, which was approved by representatives from the United States and 131 other countries, was released Monday in Paris. The full report is set to be published this year.

Its conclusions are stark. In most major land habitats, from the savannas of Africa to the rain forests of South America, the average abundance of native plant and animal life has fallen by 20 percent or more, mainly over the past century. With the human population passing 7 billion, activities like farming, logging, poaching, fishing and mining are altering the natural world at a rate “unprecedented in human history.”

At the same time, a new threat has emerged: Global warming has become a major driver of wildlife decline, the assessment found , by shifting or shrinking the local climates that many mammals, birds, insects, fish and plants evolved to survive in. [MORE]

NYPD Commish Denies Vacation Request for the Lone White Cop Facing Administrative “Trial" in the Murder of Eric Garner, a Black Man Crushed to Death by a Gang of White Cops 5 yrs Ago in Broad Daylight

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CAN’T BREATH IN A SYSTEM OF RACISM? “Anxiety is the whip in the hand of the oppressor used to drive the oppressed to completion of their appointed rounds.” From [HERE] Unless a Manhattan Supreme Court intervenes, Officer Daniel Pantaleo and the Civilian Complaint Review Board should prepare for the officer’s May 13 disciplinary trial in the 2014 death of Eric Garner, the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Trials Rosemarie Maldonado said Thursday at One Police Plaza.

Maldonado also denied Pantaleo’s attorney Stuart London’s request to allow the officer to miss part of his trial May 17 to go on a planned vacation.

That is, more than Four years after Eric Garner was fatally smothered and choked to death by a gang of white cops on a street corner in Staten Island in front of numerous witnesses and cameras in broad daylight, an internal disciplinary proceeding against one of the officers involved will take place.

Maldonado’s decision comes as Pantaleo’s defense has been trying to stop the disciplinary trial from moving forward.

The NYPD internal administrative trial will start May 13 and could take about two weeks, the judge said.

Pantaleo is expected to be prosecuted by the Administrative Prosecution Unit of the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which will ultimately make a recommendation to Police Commissioner James O'Neill. The internal NYPD hearing is not a criminal trial, and thus could not result in criminal charges being brought against Pantaleo. If found liable, the 33-year-old Pantaleo could face penalties ranging from the loss of vacation days to firing from the department.  That is, at worst, he could end up losing his job—though even then, it's unlikely that the public would be made aware of the arguments and evidence presented during the hearing, according to Jeffrey Fagan, a law professor at Columbia University who specializes in police accountability and criminal law. [MORE]

However, the Civilian Complaint Review Board is trying to charge Pantaleo with felony and misdemeanor offenses and is using the NYPD’s Patrol Guide to prove he used excessive force on Garner.

But London tried to get the CCRB’s Patrol Guide charges dismissed Thursday because he said the board had not filed those charges within 18 months.

Earlier this week, London asked New York State Supreme Court Judge Joan Madden to get the CCRB off Pantaleo’s trial.

Madden agreed to hold a hearing on May 9 to consider arguments that the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) has no jurisdiction to bring the case forward.

But the Supreme Court judge denied London’s request to issue a temporary restraining order on the upcoming trial.

After the May 9 hearing, Madden’s decision could delay the officer’s trial.

London made a similar argument against the CCRB in April, but Maldonado said then that the CCRB has jurisdiction to bring the charges forward.

Garner’s mother Gwen Carr and advocates have been calling for other officers involved in the death of Garner to also face disciplinary proceedings.

But Police Commissioner James O’Neill on Thursday declined to say whether those officers would face disciplinary proceedings or if he would agree to fire Pantaleo if the judge overseeing his trail ruled against him.

IMPACT ON THE FAMILY

Following the Thursday hearing, supporters of Garner and his mother, Gwen Carr, said the defense’s attempt to delay the trial are beginning to take a toll on Carr both physically and mentally.

“Gwen Carr is beginning to show signs of wear and tear in her mind and her body and her spirit not from any physical injury per se, but because of the continued psychological violence that the NYPD is inflicting upon her, her family and the community,” said Minister Kirsten John Foy with the Arc of Justice. “It’s unacceptable and the games that Mr. London is playing are dangerous.”

Over the summer, the NYPD said departmental charges would proceed against Pantaleo that could result in his termination.

The NYPD’s decision came a day after the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) informed the NYPD it had no objection with it moving forward.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has so far raised no objections to the NYPD’s decision.

Earlier this year, Lawrence Byrne, the former head of the NYPD Legal Bureau, said he believes the Department of Justice (DOJ) has reached a conclusion in its investigation of Eric Garner’s death.

Earlier this week, Carr said she had yet to hear from the DOJ or the NYPD.

De Blasio said he has reached out to the DOJ “repeatedly,” unsuccessfully.

“There’s never a status update I’ve never seen anything like this in my whole life, and this happened over two administrations and I am absolutely flabbergasted, I don't understand how so much time could pass,” the mayor said when asked if he has reached out to the DOJ. “Just make a decision up or down, there’s nothing, there’s no indication of a decision or whether there ever will be a decision and it makes no sense to me.”

Garner, 43, died when cops attempted to arrest him for allegedly selling loose cigarettes in Tompkinsville on July 17, 2014.

Video taken by witness Ramsey Orta showed Pantaleo wrestle Garner to the ground while Garner could be heard repeatedly shouting “I can’t breathe.”

Medical examiners ruled Garner’s death a homicide in 2014.

At a hearing in April, London revealed that the New York City Police Department’s top surgeon said Pantaleo did not use a chokehold during his fatal encounter with Garner.

“Teddy Bear Code" is Inapplicable to Whites in System of White Supremacy: Minneapolis to Pay Out $20M & Black Cop Convicted [Starbucks] Quick for Murder of White Woman; No Begging Necessary

From {NYT] In one of the largest settlements of a case involving a fatal police shooting, the City of Minneapolis agreed on Friday to pay $20 million to the family of an unarmed woman who was killed by an officer when she approached his car after he responded to her 911 call.

The announcement of the settlement, by the mayor and members of the City Council, came just three days after Mohamed Noor, who is black, Somali and Muslim, became the first Minnesota police officer convicted of murder in an on-duty killing. [Additionally the white police chief was fired 1 week after the incident].

A jury found him guilty on Tuesday in the fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk, 40, a yoga and meditation instructor. Ms. Ruszczyk, who was white, called 911 in July 2017 to report that she had heard a woman being attacked. After arriving in her neighborhood, Mr. Noor fired out of his car when she approached, killing her.

His lawyers argued during the monthlong trial that Mr. Noor, who was later fired by the police department, had shot his gun to protect his terrified partner after hearing a thump and seeing a person by the driver’s side window raising an arm.

Jurors convicted Mr. Noor of third-degree murder, which carries a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison, and second-degree manslaughter, which can lead to as many as 10 years in prison. Under Minnesota sentencing guidelines, he will likely face several years in prison, but far fewer than the maximum.

Her family had filed a lawsuit seeking more than $50 million from Minneapolis, saying that Ms. Ruszczyk’s civil rights had been violated. [MORE]

Only the Powerless Need to Riot. PHOTO OF Protest in camden last week - but it could be anywhere, usa, POLICE STATE.    Racism/White Supremacy    is a White over Black system of vast unequal power. Can a powerless person really make a demand?

Only the Powerless Need to Riot. PHOTO OF Protest in camden last week - but it could be anywhere, usa, POLICE STATE. Racism/White Supremacy is a White over Black system of vast unequal power. Can a powerless person really make a demand?

And there WAS no need for    teddy bears   , candles, signs or holding hands & singing here. JUSTICE WAS STARBUCKS QUICK. The Minneapolis police chief, Janee Harteau, resigned at the mayor’s request [IN PHOTO], less than a week after A BLACK COP fatally    shot an unarmed Australian woman    who had called 911 for help.

And there WAS no need for teddy bears, candles, signs or holding hands & singing here. JUSTICE WAS STARBUCKS QUICK. The Minneapolis police chief, Janee Harteau, resigned at the mayor’s request [IN PHOTO], less than a week after A BLACK COP fatally shot an unarmed Australian woman who had called 911 for help.

ANON EXPLAINS     : It is rare for a white police officer to be punished for using excessive force against a black man, woman, or child. It is just as rare for a black police officer to use excessive force against a white person.      In fact, the authors were unable to find a single instance of a black police officer shooting or killing an unarmed white person in the history of modern law enforcement. This is not surprising but it is absolute proof that the black individual operating within a system of white supremacy cannot mistreat whites even if he or she is wearing a uniform, a badge, and carrying a gun.”

ANON EXPLAINS: It is rare for a white police officer to be punished for using excessive force against a black man, woman, or child. It is just as rare for a black police officer to use excessive force against a white person.

In fact, the authors were unable to find a single instance of a black police officer shooting or killing an unarmed white person in the history of modern law enforcement. This is not surprising but it is absolute proof that the black individual operating within a system of white supremacy cannot mistreat whites even if he or she is wearing a uniform, a badge, and carrying a gun.”